Tattooed people don’t care if you’re not tattooed Part 2

Tattooed people don’t care if you’re not tattooed Part 2

Welcome back to the very brief history of tattoos in England, jump in the Social Pariah time machine where refreshments will be served while we head back to the 19th century. By the 19th century tattooing had spread to British society but was still largely associated with sailors and the lower or even criminal class.Even to this day tattoos are still associated with sailors and the sea a perfect example being sourpuss tentacled bag Tattooing had however been practiced in an amateur way by public schoolboys from at least the 1840 sand by the 1870s had become fashionable among some members of the upper classes, including royalty. In its upmarket form it could be a lengthy, expensive and sometimes painful process. Tattooing spread among the upper classes all over Europe in the 19th century, but particularly in Britain where it was estimated in Harmsworth Magazine in 1898 that as many as one in five members of the gentry were tattooed. Taking their lead from the British Court, where George V followed Edward VII's lead in getting tattooed; King Frederick IX of Denmark, the King of Romania, Kaiser Wilhelm II, King Alexander of Yugoslavia and even Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, all sported tattoos, many of them elaborate and ornate renditions of the Royal Coat of Arms or the Royal Family Crest. King Alfonso XIII of modern Spain also had a tattoo. Not like we need telling ,but evidence if it was needed that royalty even knew just how awesome tattoos were !. Thank you for joining us on our second trip back in time, please collect your belongings and exit to the left and we look forward to you joining us on our next trip back in time, until then stay gold.