Tattooed people don’t care if you’re not tattooed Part 1

Tattooed people don’t care if you’re not tattooed Part 1

Tattoos we love them here at social pariah, that buzz from the machine is quite an addiction which is hard to explain to people who don't have them. Now if your Facebook feed is anything like ours it's probably full of quotes popping up similar to the title of this post normally accompanied by a picture of a scantily clad model. But prepare for us to get all serious and take a very brief look at the history of tattoos in the UK when having one meant you were a social pariah ( See what we did there, now you know where our name came from !) The word tattoo itself comes from the Tahitian tatau, and was introduced into the English language following Captains Cook expeditions to the South Pacific(though the word 'tattoo' or 'tap-too', referring to a drumbeat, had existed in English since at least 1644). Cook's Science Officer and Expedition Botanist, Sir Joseph Banks, returned to England with a tattoo. Banks was a highly regarded member of the English aristocracy. In turn, Cook brought back with him a tattooed Raiatean man, Omai, whom he presented to King George and the English Court.Many of Cook's men, ordinary seamen and sailors, came back with tattoos, a tradition that would soon become associated with men of the sea in the public's mind But hang on to your socks we're going further back in time ( packed lunch not provided !) Sir Martin Frobisher (1535–1595) on May 31, 1577 set out on his voyage from Harwich, to find a north west passage to China and the promise of gold ore. Frobisher took prisoner a native Inuit man and a woman with a child; upon his return to England the woman having tattoos on her chin and forehead was a great attraction at the court of Elizabeth I. All three apparently died within a month. So now you know where the word tattoo originated from in the English Language and if you've got ink you are part of a long and rich history which pre dates all of this, but that you beautiful people is for another day.